THE LIVERPOOL CARE PATHWAY

25. Oct, 2013

BS BAFFLES BRAINS

21. Oct, 2013

TELL SOMEONE THAT OTHERS ARE TO THEIR DETRIMENT OR HARMFUL AND THEY WILL READILY BELIEVE YOU-CONDITIONING

20. Oct, 2013

COMPLIANCE EARNS YOU THE FREEDOM TO BECOME A SHEEP

19. Oct, 2013

OLIVE GOOM, 85

Olive Goom died alone aged 85 after hospital staff failed to tell her family she was being put on the pathway

Olive Goom died alone aged 85 after hospital staff failed to tell her family she was being put on the pathway

Olive Goom, 85, died alone at Chelsea and Westminster Hospital after doctors failed to tell relatives they were ending her life.

Staff reassured relatives on the phone just hours before her death in February 2011 that there was no urgent need to visit – even though doctors had already removed tubes providing vital food and fluids.

Her family discovered that she had died only when her niece, Marion Hebbourne, went to visit her and found she was already being prepared for the mortuary.

 

THOMAS JAMES, 90

 

Thomas James died on the LCP at home after he was given sedatives

Thomas James died on the LCP at home after he was given sedatives

The family of former soldier Thomas James said he was put on the pathway at his home without consulting them.

The 90-year-old, who lived near Braintree in Essex, had cancer but insisted he was not ready to die until after his granddaughter’s wedding.

But his family said he died at home in October last year after he was given sedatives by a district nurse.

The next day they were unable to wake him to give him food or drink and he fell into a diabetic coma

ANDY FLANAGAN, 48

Andy Flanagan was 'rescued' from the care pathway and lived for another five weeks

Andy Flanagan was 'rescued' from the care pathway and lived for another five weeks

Andy Flanagan, 48, was said to be severely brain damaged and close to death after a cardiac arrest.

His family gathered at his bedside last June to say their goodbyes at Queen Elizabeth Hospital in King’s Lynn, Norfolk, after it withdrew fluids and said it was going to let him ‘slip away’.

But when Mr Flanagan’s sister, who is a nurse, gently moved him to change his bloodstained sheets, he started to murmur words.

Every ten minutes relatives gave him drops of water before doctors eventually agreed to put him back on a drip.

He was able to return home, lived for another month and was able to say farewell to his loved ones. His sisters called the LCP a ‘licence to kill’.